Posts Tagged ‘robert dow’

Liveblogging! Commentary for “ITDE” 8/23/08

August 23, 2008

I’ve been in a relatively low-key mood for this broadcast. DJ Mo has been helping me get the station ready for the arrival of her guest DJ friends– they’re covering Kids Kamp in the next time slot. As I announced earlier, I played from the John Cage material made available to me by the OgreOgress label; these are recordings from their upcoming release of Cage’s “Twenty-Six with Twenty-Nine,” “Twenty-Six with Twenty-Eight & Twenty-Nine,” and “Eighty”… I’ll be hosting the world premiere for “Twenty-Six with Twenty-Eight & Twenty-Nine [Eighty-Three]” next week. Obviously, this is a pretty big deal for “It’s Too Damn Early,” and I’m proud to be part of Cage history in some small way.

Otherwise, I’m just trying to do the good volunteer thing– sprucing up the station a bit, since I’m relatively sure some of Mo’s friends have never been here before. WDBX has to make a good impression, you know? Also, The Land Of has me flustered! I screwed up the artist/album title last time I played The Green Kingdom’s disc “Laminae,” switching them up… and I did it again! Let’s hope Google cache didn’t nab me. Either way, it’s a really good album, and the package printing is lovely. Some of the Sweet Action guys were fondling it earlier. Had to suggest they find their own copy, thank you!

Alec K. Redfearn and the Eyesores — The Perforated Veil
Alec K. Redfearn and the Eyesores — Queen of the Wires
Alec K. Redfearn and the Eyesores — Myra
Alec K. Redfearn and the Eyesores — Blue on White
Alec K. Redfearn and the Eyesores — The Radiator Hymn
The Green Kingdom — Late Summer
The Green Kingdom — A Hidden Stream (alternate)
The Green Kingdom — Fuji Apple
John Cage — Twenty-six
John Cage — Twenty-nine
Choi Joonyong — Hold (entire)
Robert Dow — Steel Blue
Robert Dow — Burnt Umber
Robert Dow — White Water (airflow)

Robert Dow – “Precipitation within sight” & “White Water (airflow)”

August 20, 2008

Often, I receive promotional copies of an artist’s work that are not intended for general distribution: live sets dubbed as a single track on CDR, pre-mastered works in-progess, or compilations of selected works that could be broadcast but are not necessarily to be considered a proper album.

A while back, I was sent such a compilation by Robert Dow, director of the Soundings... festival of electroacoustic music and a researcher in the area of electroacoustic composition and performance with the University of Edinburgh. Although Dow’s knowledge of electroacoustic works far exceeds my own, I still thought it would be nice to write about one of the pieces for you– consider it half introduction, and half review.

“Precipitation within sight” is an interesting composition; generally, due to Dow’s willingness to allow natural sounds to remain unobscured by processing; and personally, as it ties closely with Miya Masaoka’s “For Birds, Planes, & Cello” which I have been enjoying recently.

Like Masaoka, Dow chooses natural sounds as both a focal point and a springboard for studio performance, constructing complimentary percussive sounds which often conjure the spacial properties of this work’s center– Smoo Cave in Durness, Scotland. Generous field recordings taken at Smoo Cave feature throughout, with indoor and outside events in evidence. Of particular beauty are Dow’s recordings of splashing water and children, appearing just prior to a bursting noise of some sort, rather like stones thrown upon a metal surface. I’m not sure what to make of the electronic whinnying that proceeds thereafter, underscored by a low rushing sound, and gradually taking aural focus… perhaps Dow is suggesting the feel of coming to the surface of water?

In his program notes, Dow states that he is interested in the “strong associative pull of such real world sounds and their tendency to create specific contexts,” which seems to be thought of as a problem among many electroacoustic artists in their rush to manipulate and obscure every source recording. Taken in this light, a reading of “Precipitation within sight” might include themes of motion as both physical movement and de/constructive energy, many of the associated emotions conjured by a journey through water, and possibly even our lingering human connection to formative natural spaces such as caves. There’s a lot to consider, so I won’t attempt to offer a conclusive summation here. Rather, I intend to whet your appetite– Dow has a release pending on the fine Russian label, Electroshock, so this might be a good time to become more acquainted with the composer.