Archive for the ‘cool’ Category

“Sounds Like Radio” Fall Campus Soundwalk, Oct. 23rd

October 17, 2012

WSIU Public Radio, a public media station of Southern Illinois University Carbondale, and the Midwest Society for Acoustic Ecology invite the general public to a Fall Soundwalk on the SIU campus on Tuesday, October 23 beginning at 12pm. The soundwalk will start at the rock wall located at the north entrance of the SIU Student Center and should last approximately one hour. A rain date for the event has been set for Tuesday, October 30 at noon.

Dave Armstrong, host of the WSIU Radio program Sounds Like Radio, will lead the soundwalk, which is being presented in association with the SIU College of Mass Communication & Media Arts’ Imagined Geographies Initiative.

“Soundwalks celebrate the practice of listening as it relates to the world around us,” says Armstrong. “I plan to introduce listening exercises to deepen the soundwalk experience for participants and to acclimate them to different ways of hearing their surroundings.”
Sounds Like Radio is a two-hour program on WSIU Radio that brings a unique perspective to everyday sounds. It features experimental music, avant-garde works, sound art, and field recordings. Sounds Like Radio airs Sundays from 3-5am and again from 10pm-12am. Comments, suggestions, and questions should be directed to soundslikeradio@wsiu.org.

About the Midwest Society for Acoustic Ecology (MSAE)
The Midwest Society for Acoustic Ecology (MSAE), founded in 2009, is a regional chapter of the American Society for Acoustic Ecology (ASAE), a membership organization dedicated to exploring the role of sound in natural habitats and human societies, while promoting public dialogue concerning the identification, preservation, and restoration
of natural and cultural sound environments. ASAE is the United States affiliate of the World Forum for Acoustic Ecology (WFAE).

About WSIU
WSIU Public Broadcasting is licensed to the Board of Trustees of Southern Illinois University and is an integral part of the College of Mass Communication & Media Arts on the Carbondale campus. The WSIU
stations reach more than three million people across five states and beyond through three digital public television channels, three public radio stations, a radio information service, a website, and an education and community outreach department.

WSIU’s mission is to improve the quality of life of the people they serve. The WSIU stations partner with other community organizations to promote positive change and to support the academic and public service missions of Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Learn more and get the latest station news online at www.wsiu.org and on WSIU’s Facebook and Twitter pages.

WSIU’s programs and services are partially funded by a grant from the IIllinois Arts Council, a state agency.

In which DaveX fires the first volley in the war on Xmas music…

November 26, 2011

Sick of jingling bells and holly-jolly everything? Put this Brian Eno playlist on, and enjoy the next 8½ hours, Xmas-free!

r/vinyl …check it out!

May 19, 2011

Some nice stuff happening here– and hey, I was there to kick it past 2,000 subscribers. If you dig vinyl, check it out!

I got a vuvuzela!

January 1, 2011

…and just in time for New Year’s, too! You can look forward to me making an awful racket with it during my show, which goes live in 4.5 hours. Or just stick your head outside around midnight, and you might hear me!

If you want your own red plastic vuvuzela, you can find them at Toys ‘R Us, in the sporting good aisle. Don’t let the “stadium horn” tag fool you– these are authentic, red, plastic vuvuzelas hahahaha.

Hawk + Tippy Headroom = Free Air!

October 29, 2010

Long-time fan and YouTube maestro Sonney Dey wrote to let me know about his latest creation– I’ll tentatively describe it as an experimental hawk documentary, but as you can see, it’s so much more than just that.

Sonney’s video makes great use of a very old track of mine, “Tippy Headroom,” from my very first album, “Music For a Sick Cat.” The title is a play on actress Tippy Hedren (of “The Birds,”) as well as Max Headroom (style icon, and personal hero).

I still remember recording “Tippy Headroom” on the floor of my home. I had been inspired by a sound experiment described in a book about Jimi Hendrix, which I had read many years earlier, but found floating about in my brain that day– in a nutshell, Hendrix had been using headphone monitors to slowly feed back into his microphone, causing squealing pitches to occur. A tape delay setup helped to create a seagull-like sound he found quite interesting. Although I’d never heard a recording of this experiment, I suppose I had a pretty good idea of how it would turn out… resulting in “Tippy Headroom.”

As a reward for Sonney’s ongoing dedication to fully experiencing the Other through my music, I’m mailing him a bunch of cool stuff– including a copy of my latest release “Free Air.” There’s only a few of these left, from a way-limited edition of ten. Just $10 gets you a copy, so hurry up and get in touch if you want one.

“Free Air” comes with two long-form works originally intended for through-home surround systems, mixed specially for stereo. There’s also the nifty artwork, a bright red unicorn hand-printed by yours truly! The print is sealed and numbered, with the disc in a separate compartment.

Circuit Benders’ Ball live improv– “Rust Bubble”

October 26, 2010

It’s taken me a while to mentally return from this weekend’s “Circuit Benders’ Ball” in Nashville, run by Ore: Theatre Intangible host Tony Youngblood. There were a number of terrific sets; I particularly enjoyed those from Robbie Hunsinger, Thriftstore Boratorium, Tim Kaiser, and Freya West. I’m not certain my own set was quite up to par, but seemed have been well-received regardless.

Capping the evening, however, went particularly well. I was invited to participate in a group improvisation with Tim Kaiser, Thriftsore Boratorium, Jeremy Walker, and Lola Wilson. I decided early to avoid a classic “Ore” pitfall, and keep my contributions relatively simple. Given that I had taken “Lawrence Welk’s Secret Shame” to the Ball as my instrument of choice, I knew that I would only be able to go so far in battling it’s rhythmic nature in an improvisational setting. I’ve found ways to extend it’s performance capabilities, but providing a steady beat is basically the heart of this device. That’s why I was pleased to discover ways to employ its natural electrical hum in useful ways during the opening portions of the improv session. What you’re hearing deep in the background is the rising and falling swells of electrical hum of the machine, bounded by rhythmic body contact touches altering the tone in subtle ways.

Later on, some audience members helped provide some additional tonal control, helping extend my circuit through their bodies. We got some great sounds, and made the whole bending process a lot more fun.

At any rate, be sure to listen to the recording. Tony got a really good capture of the audio, and did a fine job mixing everyone live. If you like it, download a copy for free and share it with a friend. Enjoy!

Liveblogging! “ITDE” 10/23/10

October 23, 2010

Lots to do today! I’ve got the SIUC campus soundwalk coming up at 10:30, and also getting ready for a performance at the Circuit Benders’ Ball in Nashville. I’ve got some copies of my new “Free Air” CDR that I’ll be bringing along– I’m very happy with these recordings, so check them out! In the meantime, here’s your playlist:

The Painful Leg Injuries — Everything Put Here Was With the Best of Intentions (from “The Anomaly That Had Gotten the Better of Me,” on OKS Recordings of North America)
Richard Pinhas — Hysteria (Palladium) (from “Metal/Crystal,” on Cuneiform)
Santiago Latorre — Alpha-Globin (from “Orbita,” on Accretions)
Santiago Latorre — Preludio
The Adjective Noun — Myspace Ruined Noise Music (Side A, on cassette of same name, on Obsolete Audio Formats)

Merzbow — Wind of Pain (from “13 Japanese Birds vol.7, Kujakubato,” on Important Records)
Merzbow — Black Swan (from “Merzbird,” on Important)

Richard Pinhas — Schizophrenia (Silver)

Duane Pitre — Koan (from “Origin,” on Root Strata)
Duane Pitre — Sun PM
Alvin Lucier — Wind Shadows

WDBX DJ Spin Party wrapup

August 5, 2010

Attendance might have been a little light, but I think the first (hopefully, annual) WDBX DJ Spin Party went very well. I was happy to see so many DJs there, and also to finally see a couple I’d never had the chance to meet before. I am also happy to report that I encountered zero instances of “hooping,” which a late-night Google Images search had convinced me might be possible. An additional bonus was my discovery of “El Paisano,”  a Mexican grocery across the street, fine purveyors of real Coca-Cola– tall glass bottles, cane sugar. Well worth it!

At any rate, it’s always nice to chat with other DJs. Countryman (Rasta Revolution, 2-4pm Friday) has started me on Alpha Blondy as a means of entry to African reggae. Fortuitously, I have several Alpha Blondy mixtapes that I picked up as part of a larger collection some years ago, but had yet to listen to. So far, so good. Sarah (Scratchy Vinyl, 7-9 am Saturday) and I discussed Freddie McCoy and some of the other fun jazz stuff lurking in the vinyl stacks. We tossed around the idea of getting some index cards for the LP sleeves, in order to leave airplay info and track recommendations for one another– and perhaps getting a little “you might like…” box going as well. Jean (Grandma’s Jazz, 10-noon Saturday) showed off her neatly-formatted playlist printouts courtesy of iTunes. It made my Sharpie marker/notebook paper look much less professional, and taught everyone a valuable lesson about age, technology, and irony.

As for my set, it was received with the usual enthusiasm reserved for long Greyhound bus rides, complete with stoic looks of grim determination and furtive nips of alcoholic beverages. There was a distinct thinning of the crowd, but I did notice a few interested listeners. Star Child (4-6 pm Saturday) assured me that getting white people to dance is nearly impossible anyway, and had personally settled for claiming an audience member’s off-rhythm toe tap for his personal victory, so I can’t be too disappointed. Despite our best combined efforts to start a sing-along, I still had to fail everyone present for general lack of enthusiasm and play Little Fyodor’s “Open Up Your Heart (And Let the Sunshine In)” as a means of behavioral correction. Truthfully, I really wanted to play this one anyway– DaveX FTW!

Some thoughts about hosting my first soundwalk

July 19, 2010

First off, let me say that I think the soundwalk went quite well, despite a couple challenges. The main obstacle was arriving to find a good portion of campus actually closed down. Apparently, the Illinois budget problems are reflecting themselves here in Carbondale– I had never seen the Student Center locked up before, nor the library, so I had to make some last-minute changes to the soundwalk itinerary. I had anticipated some reduced student population, but it had not occurred to me that the buildings themselves would be closed.

We also had some hot, humid weather. Fortunately, the soundwalk participants took it like pros, even when it later turned into a full-fledged rain shower. I was particularly impressed by the local reporter who trooped along with us– many would have gotten their quotes in the first ten minutes, invented an “important meeting” and boogied on back to the AC– kudos, Tom Barker!

So here’s the nuts and bolts of things. I’d like to share some thoughts because I’ve seen so many different ideas lately, especially on the “Phonography” e-mail list.

I started planning the soundwalk by considering a few basics first: duration of the soundwalk, ease of physically accomplishing the walk itself, and accommodating certain sounds that I considered essential. The original route actually came to me quite easily, in a rather organic fashion. I started at a location that I believe is a “resting/meeting” spot on campus, one from which it is simple to move to a variety of different places. I took some time here, just listening, figuring out what sounds were of interest. Then I’d take a bit of time in a space nearer to those, sometimes moving in an unexpected direction, but mostly attempting to obey ordinary human movements. In other words, if foot traffic pointed in a certain direction, I’d generally head that was as well.

As I moved from place to place, I kept a small notepad open, allowing me to keep a list of sounds I heard in different areas. I made no real attempt to cause sounds to occur; everytime I see this sort of action in a soundwalk, it strikes me as somehow false. I don’t want to say it’s completely wrong, but it seemed a poor choice for my purposes. Later on, I’d amend this feeling a little. In addition to the list of sounds, I also kept a list of ideas, just little phrases or concepts that would pop in my head as I considered the sounds themselves. A bell reminded me to discuss issues of power and noise, a creaky escalator prompted me to think about the use of our sense of hearing as one of our earliest warning signals to danger.

Eventually, I typed these lists up, organizing them sequentially by their location on the “trail,” with separate headings for “sounds” and “ideas”. I was very glad I did this, as it helped me re-plan the soundwalk path upon discovering the various buildings were locked up on the morning of the soundwalk.

I won’t go into the specifics of what we heard or where we went, but I do want to share a couple of my practices with you. First, I took some time before arriving in each location to engage in a small thought exercise. I asked the participants to think about what sounds they expected to hear, and also to make a mental list of adjectives they would use to describe the sound of that area as well. When we moved to the areas, I’d again ask them to reflect on these thoughts, comparing their experience to expectation.

Additionally, I would occasionally ask the participants to take a “mental snapshot” of the sound of an area, for later comparison to another. I also mentioned that they could use these “snapshots” to compare the same places during future visits in other seasons, etc. I cheated a little bit, though, check the photos: that’s Mo running the Marantz, doing her best to capture the soundwalk!

My typed list came in handy during the walk. I never expected that I would refer to it constantly, but it did serve me well for gathering up some of the ideas I wanted to discuss so I could sort of “check them off” along the way. Because I often had to find a new example to replace a sound locked up in a building, the list helped keep me focused.

I think flexibility is a must on a soundwalk as well. The newspaper article mentions that the low campus activity level was “inconvenient,” but in actuality, it was just different. As I explained, there are different sounds to be expected at different times– so the super-quiet campus because a great way to highlight the transient quality of many sounds we consider more permanent. It also made the true soundmarks stand out all the more. At one point in time, I nominated a sidewalk lamp with a large metal dome covering as a miniature soundmark. My thought was that it stands quite constantly, and will always make a small sound to note the falling of a nut or raindrop on it’s metal top. Unlike the campus clocktower, which has functioned intermittently for the past 20 years, this lamp had remained. With little or no reason to replace it, this small soundmark might be one of the most enduring on campus!

Happily, the soundwalk participants seemed to really enjoy the process. A few new sounds and sound-related phenomenon were noted, so there was an element of shared discovery to the event. As a rain shower started to blow in, we found ourselves passing through the campus woods, on the walking path through this sizeable forest. We had taken some time to listen to the sound of the wind, birds, and insects, but we had yet to hear the rain itself. Underneath the leaves and a darkening sky, we took a vote on whether to stay for the rainfall or head for the parking lot– I didn’t want to be responsible for any camera damage, or wet clothes! We ended up staying, listening to the gentle patter of raindrops on the leaves, and the occasional bird call. All in all, a pretty nice way to finish off a soundwalk!

I got a new shirt!

July 17, 2010

You can come see it tomorrow morning at 10:30, when I’ll be hosting a soundwalk tour of the SIUC campus. Meet me outside the Student Center on the north end of the building. Bring a friend– you don’t want to miss seeing this awesome new shirt of mine!

Framework:Afield episode online now

May 24, 2010

The main Framework page has my show streaming right now– just scroll down a bit to see the player. I think you can also download this episode by subscribing to the podcast. Here’s the playlist…

#285 5/23/2010

Eric Leonardson, Rinus Van Alebeek – “The Bermuda Moment”
Chas Smith – “Mardi Gras” – Cold Blue Music
Mudboy
– “The Black Creek”
Mark Peter Wright
– “Inside Flagpole”
Mark Peter Wright – “Steel Hand Railing”
Mark Peter Wright – “Interior Street Lamp”
Bernie Krause
– “Sea anemones, Alaskan tidepool”
Bernie Krause – “Carpenter ants, Arizona desert”
Jana Winderen
– The Noisest Guys On The Planet – Ash International
Kim Walker
– “I Found Salvation At Clybourn”
Claudio Curciotti
– “Maoist general strike, Pokhara Nepal”

DaveX guest-produced episode of Framework:Afield coming up!

May 22, 2010

It’s airing on Resonance FM this Sunday, May 23 at 10pm in London! That’s 4pm Sunday for folks here in Southern Illinois, or those of you listening in Nashville or Chicago. This is one of my favorite shows I’ve ever produced, so I don’t want you to miss hearing it!

2nd Annual Noise Summit– YOU MISSED OUT, SUCKAS

April 18, 2010

Noise Summit 2010 was a success! This year’s lineup included a lot of really cool stuff– hula hoops, contact mics, hammers, blenders, a theremin, an overgrown tuba, flying lens caps, exploding salt, and enough pedals to go Shirley Jackson on Bob Moog AND Ernie Ball.

I want to thank everyone who played, listened, or just helped me get in touch with the right people. Although absent from this year’s lineup, Nick helped me with phone numbers and contacting many people– and Karthik is the little bird who helps me remember names until they stick. Give these two a big “thanks” when you see them, and make their lives easier for next year by keeping in touch. As I said, we’re doing it again in 2011!

I’m going to be working to round up photos and video during this week. If you have any, share them with me! I’ll be more than happy to accept a complete dump of your memory card; no need to edit anything for me. Toss the whole mess on MediaFire or Dropbox, and I’ll share the best stuff here. Until then, enjoy these photos:

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“Hijack, Get Well”

April 18, 2010

(Note: The following text was originally written for the 6th volume of “High Carb Low Life,” a Carbondale zine, 50 special copies of which include a free CD. The CD, titled “Hijack, Get Well,” features local experimental music. “Hijack, Get Well” was also given away in a digital edition as a freebie for persons attending the 2nd Annual Noise Summit. For those of you have have somehow encountered this page without first obtaining a copy of your own– please get with the program, and download it before proceeding.

Although a full overview of experimental music in and around Southern Illinois is outside the scope of a single CD, this collage is representative of the tremendous variety of interesting and regionally unique sound experiments from the area. We begin with a loose ensemble of Nashville musicians at the direction of Tony Youngblood. His “Ore: Theatre Intangible” podcasts got their start here in Southern Illinois, carrying with them ideas we co-developed while hosting the original show together on student radio in the late 90’s. Some of our original taped samples used for those broadcasts appear as “chapter stops” throughout the CD, usually marking the beginning or end of a recording.

Alex Ryterski enters into the mix next, capturing a fractured soundwalk during a single night delivering pizzas in the area. My current broadcasts of experimental music on WDBX and WSIU both occur very late at night, but also serve as a central gathering point for odd music makers in Southern Illinois– and the Midwest isn’t a friendly place for walking. The combination of car culture, late nights, long distances, geographic separation, and the general lack of awareness about what we do makes for an interesting combination of shaping factors.

That’s Mystified in the third section, spinning out a lengthy drone set via the phone, linking his lonely sound to the lonely radio in the middle of the lonely night. Southern Illinois becomes like barely-connected points on a darkened map. Style City takes up where Mystified leaves off, interestingly enough, never having heard Mystified previously. I know– I’m Style City’s father. But there’s that Southern Illinois sound again; something pulsing, a feel of neverending-ness, like an ocean of grain or the stampede of traffic.

Another microcassette sample brings us around to an improvisation with myself and Karthik Kakarala, where small and unimportant sounds mingle without actually meeting, like so many well-meaning people.

Cover art:

Ore: Theatre Intangible — All Guitars (excerpt, complete recording features Tony Youngblood, Adam Louis, Anthony William Herndon, Ben Lowry, Brady Sharpe, Brey McCoy, Charlie Rauh, JJ Jones, and Will Floyd)
Alex Ryterski — Delivery 6pm-4am
Mystified — Live phone performance for WDBX-FM, 8/1/09
Style City — Droid (from the album “The Happening,” available free as a full download)
DaveX, Karthik Kakarala — Small Sounds Improvisation, WDBX-FM, 12/5/09

2nd Annual Noise Summit Promo– please share it!

April 12, 2010

Required Reading, vol. 37

March 31, 2010

Carbondale’s wonderful weekly “Nightlife” newspaper has a great little interview and write-up about “Sounds Like Radio,” in the April 1-8 edition. Be sure to clip it out and keep it in your wallet, for easy reference.

Or, read it right now:

Dave Armstrong, sometimes known as DaveX, will begin a new experimental-music program on Saturday nights / Sunday mornings at 3 a.m. on WSIU 91.9 FM. The show, Sounds Like Radio, will debut Sunday, April 4 at 3 a.m. He will continue to host It’s Too Damn Early on WDBX 91.1 FM, though the second program will allow him to send each show in slightly different directions.

“Although it may be difficult for casual listeners to tell, I actually cover a rather wide swath of experimental music on It’s Too Damn Early,” Armstrong tells Nightlife. “Now I can divide it up a bit, and bring some more focus to each broadcast. Besides, they’re both great stations, and I love being able to be part of each….

“Although there may be a bit of crossover at times, the general idea will be to present the more academic wing of experimental music at WSIU,” Armstrong continues. “Although there’s always some crossover, this would cover the more rigorously composed pieces of electroacoustic music, avant-garde works, or simply those that require more unpacking and intellectual effort on the part of the listener. Of course, that just gives me even more room for going further out with the WDBX broadcasts– more noise, dada, outsider works.”

Another difference: Armstrong will prerecord the WSIU show, but broadcast the WDBX program live.

“Pre-recording shows offers me a completely different set of opportunities, which I’m also pretty excited about,” Armstrong says. “Live shows gives me a flexibility that I love, but prerecording might let me go completely baroque in the studio.”

As Armstrong implies, the works he plays on his shows are often challenging for listeners– while they certainly are not noise, they are not always music per se, either, but varieties of audio art. Enjoyment and appreciation often requires a different listening mentality, he says.

“I’m a big advocate of active listening,” Armstrong says. “After nine years worth of late-night phone calls [at WDBX], I know that a lot of listeners still consider experimental music as either unwanted noise or as a sort of sonic wallpaper. It’s understandable, but intellectually lazy. If there’s anything to jettison, it’s the concept that music has to be anything more than those sounds you choose to focus upon as music. Frankly, I just hope some new people check out my broadcasts. I may not want the Little Grand Canyon in my yard, but I’ve gone to see the place– it’s an amazing part of Southern Illinois, and an offbeat treasure– same as my shows.”…

Liveblogging! Commentary for “ITDE” 3/27/10

March 27, 2010

I’ve got a couple surprises up my sleeve tonight. Also– NOISE!

And hey——— you better go to one of two shows tonight: Randall Hall and Jonathon Kirk are playing at SIU as Pendulum tonight, for free, as part of the Out of the Box Festival. Or you could go see Tatsuya Nakatani and the SIU Improv Unit at Lemp Neighborhood Arts in St. Louis. Nakatani and the siuIU are playing Sunday evening here in Carbondale as well, so if you DO see both, be sure to give me a report on the differences in performance.

A. Stroud — Come On Lovers (from “Killer Workout” on Hot Releases)
A. Stroud — Bag of Tricks
A. Stroud — Sugar Daddy
A. Stroud — The Firm
Rabbit Girls — Vomit Splash (from “Sick Problems” on Smell the Stench)
Rabbit Girls — Insertion Video
Rabbit Girls — Erektile Disjunktion
Wether — Beauty Is In the Eye of the Storm (from split with Needles, on Nail in the Coffin label)
XV Parowek — Body Warmth (from “Periodical Embarrassment” on Public Eyesore)
Dalek/DS/Oddatree — Son of Concrete (this, and next track, from Public Guilt/Implied Sound compilation “At the Doors of the Palace“)
Strotter Inst. — AN (side A) [and here’s Strotter Inst.’s current tour dates)
Review of iPod/iPhone app “ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ” by Jorg Piringer
Bastard Noise — Ice Epoch (from “Live in Japan” on Helicopter)
Pendulum — Vxatk (from “Pendulum” on Medusa Critical Publications)
Pendulum — Continuity of Etz’nab
Rabbit Girls — Militant Audio (from “Audio Insurgency II” on Roil Noise)

“Sounds Like Radio” launches April 4th!

March 12, 2010

“Sounds Like Radio,” my brand-new broadcast of experimental and avant-garde music for WSIU, will debut April 4th from 3-5 a.m.

I know you’re not doing anything important on Sunday morning, so why not get up a bit early and enjoy the show? WSIU is at 91.9 FM, or you can listen to me live online!

Incidentally, this means the show will share a birthday with Tristan Tzara! (And for those who don’t already know, “It’s Too Damn Early” shares a birthday with Alan Lomax and Philip Glass…)

I’m starting a new broadcast!

February 20, 2010

After years of personal consideration, I’m starting another broadcast. As of Friday, I’m an official host at WSIU-FM, a public radio station broadcasting from the Southern Illinois University campus.

But don’t worry; I’m not leaving WDBX-FM, or canceling “It’s Too Damn Early.” My plan is to continue my current Saturday morning broadcast, as well as host a separate 2-hour broadcast at WSIU-FM on Sunday mornings. Both broadcasts will feature experimental and avant-garde music, sound art, and difficult listening– with no repetition between the two.

Since I’ve told you so much about WDBX in the past, I figure it’s only proper to introduce WSIU as best as I can. WSIU is a non-commercial station, and our local public radio broadcaster. They have programming from NPR, PRI, and some locally-produced shows as well. If you’re a fan of Celtic music, you may have heard “Celtic Connections,” which is carried in syndication on dozens of public radio affiliates across the United States.

Whereas WDBX currently broadcasts at 3000 watts, WSIU is at 50,000 watts. To make things even more fun, WSIU employs two “repeater” transmissions in Mt. Vernon and Olney for a total of 88,000 watts. As I understand it, this not only covers the lower-third of Illinois, but parts of Missouri and Indiana as well! Obviously, this will be a much larger listening audience, so I’m very excited. For those outside the broadcast area, WSIU streams online– and I have been told that archiving shows is a distinct possibility.

Quite possibly, this will be the largest broadcast of experimental music anywhere in the state; it will certainly make Southern Illinois a prime destination for sound artists, experimental musicians, and composers of new music.

For now, I’ll be working on getting the first few broadcasts ready, and checking my WSIU mailbox for the first promos I hope everyone will be able to send my way. If all goes well, the show will most likely be launching in early April, so send some music in!

Here’s my address at the station:

WSIU-FM, c/o Dave Armstrong
Communications Building 1003, Mail Code 6602
SIUC, 1100 Lincoln Dr.
Carbondale, IL 62901 USA

Style City limited edition CDR– out now!

January 23, 2010

Style City’s “The Happening” CDR is out now, available in a trades-only limited edition of 10. Some are already in the mail, so don’t sleep on this!

The artwork is great– each comes packaged in a vintage elementary school reading lab book; with handmade rubbings decorating the outer ribbon. A black-and-white insert and color collage interior round out this nifty-looking debut

Entirely the work of a 10-year-old girl and a synth nearly three times her age; “The Happening” features minimal drones, surprisingly morbid lyrics, and an ode to giant robots. Highly recommended for fans of The Shaggs, Chica X, and outsider art.

Download a free copy here, or send a message to: stylecitymusik@myspace.com for availability.